The Conqueror versus Ely
Trevor Bevis

A problem with deep history is the tendency for myth to over-ride fact. This little book attempts to lift recorded facts to an acceptably believable level and explains what happened in the fens more than 900 years ago. It was the time when a new nation was being forged; when Anglo-Saxon and Norman blood began altering the course of English history and founding a new destiny for the nation. One that affected the world in many ways and conceived the greatest empire ever known.

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Product details
Author: Trevor Bevis
Number of pages: 20
Publication date: 2003
ISBN: 0901680729

A problem with deep history is the tendency for myth to over-ride fact. This little book attempts to lift recorded facts to an acceptably believable level and explains what happened in the fens more than 900 years ago. It was the time when a new nation was being forged; when Anglo-Saxon and Norman blood began altering the course of English history and founding a new destiny for the nation. One that affected the world in many ways and conceived the greatest empire ever known.

The Battle of Hastings in 1066 was over in less than a day and, by all accounts, was a close-run thing. For the following five years the Conqueror was hard pressed putting down uprisings in the land, these carried out expeditiously and ruthlessly, the Saxons aspiring to encourage a nation-wide rebellion and hopefully eject the invader from the land. The rebellion on the Ise of Ely is mentioned in various 13th Century manuscripts.

The Anglo-Saxon’s hope was best realised on the Isle where, led by Hereward, nobles and eminent Churchmen held out against the King for a year until the abbot of Ely, weary of events, arranged for him to enter the Isle by a secret route. Thus ended the Saxon’s epic resistance seriously envisaged by the King as potentially threatening his rule.

 

Weight 0.064 kg
Dimensions 21 × 15.5 × 0.5 cm
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